Author - Sarah Budasz, Blog, events, MLAC events, PG events, Reading Groups, Research Groups

MLAC EVENTS BULLETIN: 5th – 11th February

Talks and Events

Monday 5th February

IAS Fellow’s Seminar – Loving Recognition: a proposal for the practical efficacy of love as a public virtue

13:00-14:00, Seminar Room, Institute of Advanced Study, Professor Nigel Rapport (University of St Andrews)

Aldous Huxley observed: ‘From solitude in the womb we emerge into solitude among our fellows, and return again to solitude within the grave. We pass our lives in the attempt to mitigate that solitude, but propinquity is never fusion’. Professor Rapport takes Huxley’s statement to be an ontological truth. He asks: Given the solitudinous nature of the human condition, how best to imagine a moral society? He suggests that a moral society is one where the irreducible distance between individuals translates neither into indifference nor into stereotypification; human beings are recognized as individuals and not in terms of external collective categories and classes of purported belonging (concerning nationality, ethnicity, religion, class, gender, and so on). A proposal is made that love might function as that public virtue which both extends recognition towards the human other and at the same time recognises the others’ absolute distinctiveness. Love might play the foundational social-structural role of effecting a universal social integration where any and every human being—‘Anyone’—is accorded a place while at the same time being afforded the symbolic space to come into its own.

Places are limited
and so any academic colleagues interested in attending a seminar should register online in advance to reserve a place. Places will be confirmed within 48 hours of receipt (subject to availability).

Contact enquiries.ias@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.

 

Northern Lights A Cappella Concert at the Gala Theatre

19:30-21:00, Gala Theatre, Durham

Durham University’s award-winning A Cappella group the ‘Northern Lights’ will be taking the spotlight in Durham’s largest theatre for one evening only on 5th February, as part of the Durham Vocal Festival.
Having sold out their concert last year, the group can’t wait to amaze their audience for a second appearance on the Gala stage.

Northern Lights is made up of 16 Durham University students from all over the world, as far afield as Japan and America, who regularly perform and compete at events across the country.

This talented group of performers create music and stun their audiences solely through the power of the human voice. Only three years old, they are very proud to say that they arrange their own pieces and choreograph their own routines.

The group recently reached the semi-finals of the International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella (ICCAs) and are looking forward to returning to Edinburgh where their shows sold out at last year’s Fringe Festival. Last year they recorded their first EP, ‘Bright Lights, Small City’, which includes their rendition of the song ‘Don’t Look Back in Anger’ accompanied by a polished, powerful music video.

Northern Lights are thrilled to announce that their supporting act for the evening will be the fantastic youth choir ‘Urban Voice’ from Egglescliffe School in Stockton. Founded only four years ago, the group has won two national awards and performed at the Royal Albert Hall.

Tickets are available from the Gala Theatre website:
https://www.galadurham.co.uk/galapost/durham-vocal-festival-northern-lights/

Contact acappella.society@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.

 

Tuesday 6th February

Children’s Literature, Intertextuality and Gender

16:00-17:00, Williams Library, St Chad’s College, Jade Dillon (University of Limerick)

The first of a series of three public lectures looking at children’s literature.

The speaker, Jade Dillon, is a doctoral researcher in the Department of English Language and Literature at Mary Immaculate College, University of Limerick. Her research interests are in Victorian and modern children’s literature, psychoanalysis, cinema, and gender theory.

Other lectures in the series include Young Adult Fiction and the Male Gaze on 7th February and Fairy Tales and Feminist Rewritings on 8th February.

This series of lectures is co-organised by the Department of English Studies and St Chad’s College.

Contact s.r.regan@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.

 

IAS Fellow’s Public Lecture – Residues: architecture, drawing, philosophy

17:30-18:30, Ustinov Room, Van Mildert College, Professor Michael Chapman (Newcastle University, Australia)

This lecture will explore the interrelationship between architecture and philosophy as it has been played out through the medium of drawing, and with a particular emphasis on post-enlightenment and early modernist discourses around representation and philosophy. The lecture will look at the emergence of architectural drawing as a medium to both explore and critique philosophical structures in the post-Enlightenment, and equally as an escape from the disciplinary constraints of architecture as building. Using the framework of cosmologies, the lecture will look at the way that philosophy and architectural drawing developed a dialogue in the work of key architects who questioned the frameworks of architectural production, and, in the process, expanded the medium of architectural representation into a philosophical, phenomenological and also deeply psychological domain. Using key themes drawn from philosophy, the lecture explores how love, fear, existence, nature and science all found themselves entwined in this new medium of expression, and the implications this had for architecture both then and now.

This lecture is free and open to all.

Details about Professor Michael Chapman

Contact enquiries.ias@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.

 

The Marina Project

17:30, Palace Green Library Learning Centre, Professor Ewan Fernie (University of Birmingham)

Joint IMEMS/Centre for Medical Humanities Lecture. The lecture will be followed by a wine reception. Booking is essential.

‘The Marina Project’, led by Ewan Fernie and Katharine Craik, is an ongoing collaboration with the Royal Shakespeare Company, which fuses academic scholarship and creative experiment. The project focuses on Marina’s chastity in Pericles as a rich channel for re-thinking Shakespeare’s radical political potential in our own globalised world. Shakespeare’s Pericles recoils at the beginning of the play from a surreally intense sex trauma which is explicitly mapped onto forced displacements caused by war, terror and atrocity. But his ‘absolute Marina’ fights off this corruption – and does so as a young girl sex-trafficked into a foreign brothel.

Fernie will describe how ‘The Marina Project’ reimagines Marina’s heroic chastity in and for the present, positing a new idea of radical chastity as the most intimate and surprising form of sexual and political liberation. He will include some sharing of and reflection on passages from a new devised play, Marina, and describe the project’s broad-ranging inter-cultural and inter-faith academic/theatrical workshop and conversation as led at the RSC Other Place by Richard Twyman, who was formerly International Director of the Royal Court and has worked widely in the Middle East and at ‘The Jungle’ camp for migrants in Calais. The conversation also includes Durham’s own Professors, David Fuller and Corinne Saunders.

Ewan Fernie is Chair and Professor of Shakespeare Studies at The Shakespeare Institute, Stratford-upon-Avon. He is author of Shame in Shakespeare, The Demonic: Literature and Experience and Macbeth, Macbeth (with Simon Palfrey). His latest book is Shakespeare for Freedom: Why the Plays Matter (CUP, 2017). His edited or coedited books include Spiritual Shakespeares, Reconceiving the Renaissance, Redcrosse: Remaking Religious Poetry for Today’s World, Thomas Mann and Shakespeare, and the forthcoming New Places: Shakespeare and Civic Creativity. He is General Editor (also with Palfrey) of the Shakespeare Now! Series, and he is currently working on the part played by Shakespeare in the making of modernity in nineteenth-century Birmingham.

Contact admin.imems@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.

 

Wednesday 7th February

IMEMS Seminar: Professor Tom McLeish and Professor Giles Gasper ‘Tours of the Cosmos from Dante to Dark Matter’

13:00, IAS Seminar room, Cosin’s Hall, Palace Green

Places will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis; booking is essential.

Dante’s gaze into Beatrice’s eye initiates a grand tour of the medieval cosmos, a structure of overwhelming grandure and consequence. A similar gaze into the new eyes we have constructed for ourselves over the last generation take us today on a similar tour of the vaster-still modern cosmological model. Are there any moral lessons for humanity, other than our insignificance to be learned from this, contemporary, grand tour?

Tom McLeish FRS is currently Professor of Physics and Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Research at Durham University (from 2018 Professor of Natural Philosophy at the University of York, UK). His research has contributed to the new field of ‘soft matter physics’ – work with chemists, engineers and biologists connects molecular structure with emergent material properties. He has also led large academic-industrial collaborations. He is currently Principal Investigator of the UK ‘Physics of Life’ network, funded by EPSRC and BBSRC. Other academic interests include the framing of science, society and science policy, the history and philosophy of science (the ‘Ordered Universe’ project is re-examining scientific treatises from the 13th century), and theological narratives of science and technology, resulting in the recent book Faith and Wisdom in Science (OUP 2014). He has been a Reader in the Anglican Church since 1993 and is a trustee of the John Templeton Foundation.

Giles Gasper is a specialist in medieval thought and culture, and is Principal Investigator of the Ordered Universe project, dedicated to interdisciplinary readings of medieval science. Educated at the Universities of Oxford and Toronto, Gasper’s work focuses on medieval intellectual history, the social location of ideas, and the longer histories of science and religion.

Contact admin.imems@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.

 

Lunchtime Concert Series: Durham Opera Ensemble

13:15-13:45, Music Department Concert Room, Palace Green

Join Music Durham for their next lunchtime concert, this week featuring soloists and chorus from Durham Opera Ensemble. The concert is free of charge.

Contact abigail.groocock@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.

 

The Henry Tudor Memorial Lecture: “Legitimacy, Dictatorship and Utopia: A Marxist Perspective”

16:00-18:00, IM102, Al-Qasimi Building, Professor Lea Ypi (LSE)

The Centre for Political Thought Invites you to the Henry Tudor Memorial Address.

“Legitimacy, Dictatorship and Utopia: A Marxist Perspective”

Lea Ypi is a Professor of Political Theory at the LSE and Associate Professor in Philosophy at the Research School of Social Sciences at the Australian National University. Before joining the LSE, she was a Post-doctoral Prize Research Fellow at Nuffield College (Oxford). A native of Albania, she has studied Philosophy and then Literature at the University of Rome, La Sapienza. Her research interests are in normative political theory (including democratic theory, theories of justice, and issues of migration and territorial rights), Enlightenment political thought (especially Kant), Marxism and critical theory, as well as nationalism in the intellectual history of the Balkans (especially Albania). She is a co-editor of The Journal of Political Philosophy. Her publications include The Architectonic of Reason: Teleology and the Unity of Reason in Kant’s first Critique, (OUP, forthcoming); with Jonathan White The Meaning of Partisanship (OUP, 2016); and Global Justice and Avant-Garde Political Agency (OUP, 2012).

Contact maria.dimova-cookson@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.

 

Durham Early Modern Group: London, Locke, and 1690s Provisions for the Poor in Context: Beggars, Sailors, Spinners and Slaves; Workhouses, Wars, Coins and Companies; England, Ireland, Scotland and the Caribbean

16:30-18:30, History Department, SR1, John Marshall (Johns Hopkins University)

Contact s.j.c.taylor@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.

 

Young Adult Fiction and the Male Gaze

17:00-18:00, Department of English Studies, Jade Dillon (University of Limerick)

The second in a series of three lectures looking at children’s literature.

The speaker, Jade Dillon, is a doctoral researcher in the Department of English Language and Literature at Mary Immaculate College, University of Limerick. Her research interests are in Victorian and modern children’s literature, psychoanalysis, cinema, and gender theory.

Other lectures in the series include Children’s Literature, Intertextuality and Gender on 6th February and Fairy Tales and Feminist Rewritings on 8th February.

This series of lectures is co-organised by the Department of English Studies and St Chad’s College.

Contact s.r.regan@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.

 

‘Listen your way in/with the mouth’: the Poetry of Paul Celan

18:15-19:15, Elvet Riverside 142, Professor David Fuller

In our fifth Arts of Breath event Prof David Fuller will consider the role of breath in the work of Paul Celan.

Paul Celan (1920-1970) was a Jewish Romanian-born German-language poet and translator. This lecture will examine his breath-related theories of poetic structure as described in his Georg Büchner prize speech, Meridian (1960), and as put into practice in his later poetry, particularly the collection Atemwende (Breath-turn, 1967), with illustrations from archive of recordings by Celan himself. It will also consider ways in which Celan’s work has been taken up in contemporary German culture by musicians, with a range of illustrations from the popular to the avant-garde.

David Fuller is Emeritus Professor of English at Durham, and former University Orator. He teaches on Shakespeare and has written on subjects from Medieval to contemporary. As a trained Musicologist, he is also interested in music, especially opera and song.

Free, no need to book. All welcome.

Contact sarah.mclusky@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.

 

Contemporary Art in Focus with Susie Green

19:00-22:00, Tunstall Gallery, Norman Chapel, Durham Castle, Susie Green

Susie Green and Rory Pilgrim perform as The Brilliant State to present ‘Floating we find each other, we find each other floating’, a new performance that combines music, movement and spoken and sung lyrics to consider themes of weightlessness and contact. Both artists share an interest in the extent to which intimacy can be achieved and how music and song can contribute to this, specifically in the sublime acoustics of the Norman Chapel.

This performance forms part of Susie Green’s residency at Durham Castle which also includes a talk (Feb. 14th, 2pm at TESTT Space, North Rd) and an exhibition in Durham Castle (Feb. 14 – 28), public view Feb 14th at 7 – 8.30pm.
Supported by University College and Durham University Centre for Visual Arts and Culture.
All welcome, free, no booking required.

 

Thursday 8th February

Structuring Knowledges: Rethinking empire in the middle ages: the view from Byzantine and Islamic North Africa – Seminar

16:15-17:30, Seminar Room 2, Department of History, 43 North Bailey, Dr Corisande Fenwick (University College, London)

This seminar is one in a series entitled “Restructuring Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages (AD c.300 – c.800)”, a research programme organised jointly between the Departments of History, Archaeology and Classics, supported by the Institute of Advanced Study. Students as well as staff are welcome, but places are limited. In conjunction with these seminars, the speakers will offer a series of workshops for postgraduates.
For more information and to register, contact Helen Foxhall Forbes (h.g.foxhallforbes@durham.ac.uk)

 

Fairy Tales and Feminist Rewritings

17:00-18:00, Williams Library, St Chad’s College, Jade Dillon (University of Limerick)

The third and final public lecture in a series looking at children’s literature.

The speaker, Jade Dillon, is a doctoral researcher in the Department of English Language and Literature at Mary Immaculate College, University of Limerick. Her research interests are in Victorian and modern children’s literature, psychoanalysis, cinema, and gender theory.

Other lectures in the series include Children’s Literature, Intertextuality and Gender on 6th February, and Young Adult Fiction and the Male Gaze on 7th February.

This series of lectures is co-organised by the Department of English Studies and St Chad’s College.

Contact s.r.regan@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.

The Future of the University Public Lecture Series – A University Education

20:00-21:00, Great Hall, University College, The Rt. Hon. the Lord David Willetts

The English higher education system is very unusual with nationwide competition for entry This drives excessive specialisation in English schools which is the biggest single challenge facing universities in the future. As well as its classic teaching and research roles, the university is increasingly significant in driving innovation and the local economy. This third mission has led some critics to argue that the university is being betrayed and these fears, especially prevalent in the Humanities, will be investigated. The key trends of globalisation and the digital revolution have not yet had a big impact on the university but they will. David Willetts’ book A University Education is published by OUP in November 2017.

This lecture is free and open to all, and is on a first come, first served basis. The series will be held in the Great Hall at University College (Durham Castle). Doors will open at 7.45pm.For further information contact the IAS (enquiries.ias@durham.ac.uk).

 

Friday 9th February

A University Education: a podium discussion with The Rt Hon. the Lord David Willetts

09:30-10:30, Senate Suite, University College, Durham University, The Rt Hon. the Lord David Willetts

A University Education

The Rt Hon. the Lord David Willetts will be sharing his vision of the Future of the University and debating his views with Professor Peter Coveney (University College London) on Friday 9 February, 09.30-10.30 in the Senate Suite, University College (Durham Castle).

Capacity is limited to this discussion event, and places must be registered in advance here.

This is the second of two events hosted by the Institute of Advanced Study and University College. The Rt Hon. the Lord David Willetts will give a public lecture on Thursday 08 February 2018 at 8.00pm (see details) .

David Willetts, Baron Willetts of Havant, was Minister for Universities and Science in the Coalition Government 2010-2014, having previously served as an adviser in the Treasury and Margaret Thatcher’s policy unit. He famously presided over the introduction of £9000 student fees, the opening of the university market to alternative for-profit providers, and the removal of the enrolment cap. As an eloquent and scholarly Oxford-educated critic of Oxbridge privilege and promotor of university pluralism, notably in teaching quality and curriculum breadth, and an unrepentant advocate of the need for market-driven continuous change of the university in today’s global context, he remains to this day a figure of controversy. Yet he is also a fierce critic of unintended Brexit consequences and the Home Office immigration policy on foreign students, a strong apologist of the British universities’ tradition of international research excellence, and a staunch defender of university autonomy, who sees the university as a chief pillar of occidental and global advancement. In the footsteps of Wilhelm von Humboldt, John Henry Newman – and David Lodge – David Willetts has just published his personal memoir and vision of the future, A University Education (OUP, 2017).

Contact enquiries.ias@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.

 

Saturday 10th February

Musicon Focus: 20th Century Music

19:30-21:30, Music Department, Palace Green

Musicon Concert Series 2017/2018
Four concerts of enthralling music from the last four decades of the twentieth century. 20th Century Music 2: the 1970s Lore Lixenberg mezzo-soprano Trevor Wishart sound diffusion Ives Ensemble

Contact joyce.dent@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.
Sunday 11th February

Musicon Focus: 20th Century Music

13:30-14:15, Music Department, Palace Green

Musicon Concert Series 2017/2018
Four concerts of enthralling music from the last four decades of the twentieth century
20th Century Music 3: the 1990s
Ives Ensemble Quartet

Contact joyce.dent@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.

 

Musicon Focus: 20th Century Music

19:30-21:30, Music Department, Palace Green

Musicon Concert Series 2017/2018
Four concerts of enthralling music from the last four decades of the twentieth century
20th Century Music 4: the 1980s
Ives Ensemble

Contact joyce.dent@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.

 

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